The Whale Show (Jungle Theatre)

The Whale Show is a family production that uses a large puppetry to enlighten and entertain the audience. The two protagonists have spent so much time with whales they behave just like them and even speak whale language, sharing their awe and wonder of these magical creatures. Themes include similarities and differences between whales and humans, threats to whales and whale facts and figures. The audience is encouraged to think critically about their values and the importance of whale conservation when the audience is invited to stop the giant harpoon.

The Whale Show is 45 minutes in duration and is suitable for Grades R – 3. An accompanying drama skills workshop of 45 minutes is also available.

After a 3 year hiatus The Whale Show, based on Heathcote Williams’ ‘Whale Nation’, returned to the stage in 2011 opening with a run at Kalk Bay Theatre. Created in 2001, the play has toured the National Arts Festival; Out The box festival, the Whale Festival in Hermanus; and numerous schools as part of International Fund for Animal Welfare’s (IFAW) outreach education and awareness campaigns including twinning programmes with underprivileged and privileged schools. It has also been included in the YES programme for Marine Week and enjoyed successful public runs in Knysna, Plettenberg Bay and Muizenberg in 2008. In October 2015 The Whale Show traveled to the Overstrand region where it was performed for learners from local schools. The show was last performed at the City of Cape Town, Biodiversity Management Staff at their year end function in November 2016.

Isihumane and Malume is an interactive clown performance using traditional storytelling and physical theatre to explore themes of HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Performed in either isiZulu or isiXhosa, Isihumane and Malume pushes the boundaries, taboos, and social norms about HIV/AIDS, gender, and violence against women through humour and laughter.

A long, long time ago there was a family that lived in a small village. They were very happy together in their little home. The father worked in the fields while the mother was busy at home cleaning and cooking. They had two daughters who were very helpful to their mother. The older ones name was Dema and the last born was Demazana….

When 5 clowns arrive in a school ready to tell a traditional South African story, “Dema and Demazane,” things turn upside down. They get lost in the story and discover that STIs, sugar daddies, gender norms and discrimination, and sexual violence are no laughing matter…

But in the face of all these difficult issues that affect us all so personally, how can we not but find humour in our common existence? As the clowns blunder through the story, climbing on top of and through each other, they discover that we all share common fears, misconceptions, and desires around sex and sexuality.

Isihumane and Malume approaches these issues and more through the power of laughter and play. The performance is provocative, insightful, and, as all Clowns Without Borders productions, disarmingly funny!

 

 

6 actors, 5 acts, 75 minutes, 6 puppets and 3 masks – Brett Goldin Bursary winner, Nkosinathi Gaar, uses his training with the Royal Shakespeare Company and experience with The Handspring Puppet Company to take the famed ‘Scottish Play’ to a new level and new audience. A young, exciting cast bring refreshing energy to the well-known play.

Logo-to-go-with-Macbeth-production

Complexion is about a girl who grows up in the township facing different challenges at different stages of her life. We see the world through her eyes from the time she is born, we are introduced to the various people in her life who shape and mould the complexities of her complexion.

I developed this play with an interest in telling stories about the world I know and grew up in. Not only did I want to tell a story about a young black girl who grows up in a township, I also wanted to speak back to how the township is a mechanism that informs, consumes and cripples children. Using some of my own personal narratives, observations and investigations I created a 6 minute work which I performed for my 4th year performance exam. I was encouraged to extend and develop the performance text. In the process I have been intrigued by how social systems have been normalized and how these norms have a way of shaping and affecting humans. Do we have the agency to change ourselves and/or our context? TO BE OR NOT TO BE… has been the leading theme of this play; to survive or not to survive? To be oppressed or to not be oppressed? To be …

A Girl Called Owl charts a friendship that starts in the heat of the Overberg summer between two ten-year-old girls, finding them again six years later. Olivia arrives in the town with her Dad; she is the new girl, the quiet girl, the weird girl. Then she meets Kay, the girl with the scar. Horwitz performs over ten characters, from the two young girls and their teenage counterparts to both their fathers and a group of boisterous men. Owl is a story about climbing trees, punching boys and kissing girls, touching sensitively, and not without humour, on issues including: coming of age – identity and choice; teen sexuality; homosexuality; domestic abuse; being/feeling different; friendship; love; violence – physical/implicit; changing relationships with authority figures/parents/teachers. The lead character is a girl so the play may be classed under ‘women’s issues’. However, the way in which she relates to the men in her environment, and they to her, makes this play important for men as well.

Written and directed by Jon Keevy, performed by Briony Horwitz, with staging by Fiona du Plooy and music composed for the show by Brydon Bolton, A Girl Called Owl premiered as Owl in 2012, receiving praise such as ‘Horwitz delivers an enchanting performance. Her versatility as an actress is astonishing…moving and evocative.” (Cape Times); “… beautifully observed…totally delicious …” (Megan’s Head) and four stars from the Cape Argus. Since then it has travelled all over SA and at the 2012 National Arts Festival it was invited to the Brighton and Prague Fringe festivals. At Brighton it gathered more praise, including two 5-star reviews and a nomination by Latest magazine as Best International Performance.

A barman, trapped by the codes of the bar that render him invisible; a flamboyantly macho cowboy, with a flair for the Argentine Tango; and a guarded woman, whose sensuous alter ego is released as she nurses her wine as if it were mother’s milk; all hover at the edge of existence, ever short of bridging the gaps between them.  The one minute they’re keeping time to the music, the next they’ve slipped out of the real time of their unfulfilled lives and into the vacuous space of the bar.  They flirt, fight, drink and forget, fuelled by the answers they find at the bottom of the glass.

Untouchable Productions presents:
BLOOD ORANGE
a new work
Directed by Greig Coetzee
Performed by Craig Morris
Scripted by Greig Coetzee, Craig Morris & Troy Blacklaws
From the Novel by Troy Blacklaws

Greig Coetzee directs the latest exciting offering by physical theatre performer Craig Morris.

The story of Gecko, a boy who has an oblique, out-of-sync way of seeing the world, of his childhood among the green hills of Natal and of his jagged school days in the Cape, where the Simonsberg drinks the Blood Orange sun at dusk. James Dean and Wilbur Smith have two-bit parts in this drama that begins with man landing on the moon and ends with Mandela riding a mermaid to freedom. A Zany “Catcher in the Rye“!Festival favourite Greig Coetzee is well known to Natal audiences, and has performed extensively here over the last decade. He has recently decided to devote more time to his first love, writing, and less to performance.

Craig Morris was schooled at Port Shepstone High before studying at Rhodes University under Andrew Buckland and Prof. Gary Gordon as a founder member of The First Physical theatre Company. Festinos will remember Craig from Attachments 1-6, and Hero (directed by Andrew) which performed at Hilton last year.

Troy Blacklaws is the author of the original novel Blood Orange. He was born in Pinetown, studied at Rhodes and now teaches and writes in Germany! He recently flew out from Germany to attend the premiere performances of Blood Orange in Grahamstown!

Three very distinctive creative voices have come together to create, in collaboration, what is fast becoming a contemporary Physical Theatre classic!

THE MARKET THEATRE in association with DFL presents, THE LINE.

THE LINE is the culmination of multi-award winning Actor, Director Gina Shmukler’s Masters Research on trauma and theatre making.

THE LINE is a play about the nature of human and moments in time in South Africa. Having spent several months in the townships THE LINE is constructed from a series of interviews with South Africans involved or affected by the xenophobic attacks that took place in May 2008.

THE LINE explores the fragility of goodness and questions how the attacks were born, who is responsible, what makes good people do bad things and how one crosses the line?

THE LINE is written and directed by Gina Shmukler with music by Charl-Johan Lingenfelder and Production Design by Niall Griffin.

Starring Khutjo Green and Gabi Harris.

PG 14

TACTICS is a collection of daring short plays written by young South African writers who have worked with The Framework.

Five short plays are performed by performers, they will play different parts, and the plays will be performed in a different order to create a completely new whole. In keeping with the Framework’s ethos, no two performances will be the same.

All the plays are multiply cast, allowing the actors to play different roles each time. Both actors and audience formulate relationships and meaning afresh at each showing. To this end, the actors have been Framework-trained, but not rehearsed, so that they have to thrash out their virgin choices before the audience.

The Framework’s team brings this new, totally edgy, intersection between text and performance in a style that demands the following of the performers: Play yourself, play the best part of yourself, don’t ever apologise and play to win.

Theatre 4 Youth