History of SA: Quick-Quick One Time!

The show uses storytelling to relate the ancient and not commonly known history of the roots of the South African people. History of SA: Quick-Quick One Time! locates the different cultures through the various provinces, giving the learners an in to geography, taking them through celebration ceremonies, ancient art, music and celebrates the South African languages. The show in its current incarnation is suitable for learners from the age of 3 to 7, but can be crafted and extended according to the schools specifications to be suitable for ages between 3 – 13, elaborating more on the different aspects of cultures, ranging from cuisine to traditional garb, to current dynamics (i.e. a modern South Africa in which citizens are not bound to their homelands but move freely in the country to find employment, to marry into different cultures) and to widen their knowledge of their country. The piece is interactive therefore smaller groups of between 20 to 25 children are ideal, however the piece can be crafted for larger groups with less interaction and more storytelling.

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

uNontombi is a traditional musical play which portrays two men fighting over a beautiful woman in a Zulu village. The young man Mkhonto make use of traditional powers to win the love of uNontombi as our story continues the audience witnesses a crucial turn where love is taking its direction. we see mbuzini a close friend of Mkhonto betrays him by proposing uNontombi and only to find out that she loves Mbuzini more than Mkhonto.

Isihumane and Malume is an interactive clown performance using traditional storytelling and physical theatre to explore themes of HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Performed in either isiZulu or isiXhosa, Isihumane and Malume pushes the boundaries, taboos, and social norms about HIV/AIDS, gender, and violence against women through humour and laughter.

A long, long time ago there was a family that lived in a small village. They were very happy together in their little home. The father worked in the fields while the mother was busy at home cleaning and cooking. They had two daughters who were very helpful to their mother. The older ones name was Dema and the last born was Demazana….

When 5 clowns arrive in a school ready to tell a traditional South African story, “Dema and Demazane,” things turn upside down. They get lost in the story and discover that STIs, sugar daddies, gender norms and discrimination, and sexual violence are no laughing matter…

But in the face of all these difficult issues that affect us all so personally, how can we not but find humour in our common existence? As the clowns blunder through the story, climbing on top of and through each other, they discover that we all share common fears, misconceptions, and desires around sex and sexuality.

Isihumane and Malume approaches these issues and more through the power of laughter and play. The performance is provocative, insightful, and, as all Clowns Without Borders productions, disarmingly funny!

 

 

Playtime Antics is a nonverbal clown performance for children of all ages.

In theatre one of the more impactful styles of performance is that of ‘Clowning‘. Clowning enables the performer to stay centred on the audience, being accessible to them so that he in turn can open up to them and their energy. This informs his performance, ensuring true impact.

This style together with a non-verbal presentation also asks both performer and audience member ‘to listen with their eyes’, essentially employing other sensory mechanisms in understanding and comprehending – delivering what has been hailed a truly unique and enriching theatre experience

With this year’s performance, we will be exploring relationships on the playground…relationships which we seem to encounter in adulthood as well and therefore an all to pertinent theme to explore … is it possible to form and maintain meaningful relationships regardless of our differences…can the bully, the shy girl and the smart boy in class be friends?

 

Once Upon a Fire is a dance and story-telling production aimed at children and families. 3 Performers will delve into the treasure trove of stories from our continent and beyond and weave them together into a new story, celebrated in dance. This cross-disciplinary production combines dance, traditional storytelling, object play, vocal mis-en-scene, physical characterisation and comedy.

Look Before You Leap: Being Right deals with democracy, human rights, racism and discrimination.

Focussing in particular on the issues of diversity and inclusivity such as poverty, inequality, race, gender, language, age, and disability, discrimination on the basis of race, religion, culture, gender, sexuality, age, ability and language, as well as the concepts of institutionalised racism, xenophobia, and other forms of “othering”, are addressed.

The story pivots around the election of a school’s Student Representative Council. The Learners are introduced to the candidates standing for election, their motivation for running and each candidate’s aims and objectives outlined in their campaigns’. The Audience become the electorate, participating actively in the democratic processes that support and promote the promotion and advancement of the candidates, while simultaneously being privy to the ‘real’ experience of the identity, concerns and motivations of the characters.

Personal and individual needs are placed in a social context that encourages acceptance of diversity and fosters commitment to the values and principles entrenched in the Constitution. The show deals with social relationships and human rights and responsibilities, including how knowledge and understanding of diversity and inclusivity contributes to the development of responsible citizenship and social justice.

The aim is that audience will become (more) politically literate in terms of knowing, understanding and actively participating in democratic processes, both socially and politically. The importance of volunteerism, social service and involvement in a democratic society are emphasised, and the causes, consequences and prevention of pervasive social ills, such as HIV, and all forms of violence and abuse, are also addressed.

SENIOR PHASE (Grades 8 and 9)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

FET PHASE (Grade 10 – 12)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Democracy and human rights

About Us: Playing For Keeps follows two school friends whose carefree lives just got complicated. The class joker discovers that his sibling, who he thought was overseas, is actually in hospital with AIDS, and his personal search to try to come to terms with and understand it – bringing his family back together in the process. Meanwhile his pretty classmate is overwhelmed by the attentions of an older boy, who showers her with company, and gifts, and attention – but what does he want in exchange?

Through the course of the action the audience is introduced to HIV and AIDS and Tuberculosis; how they affect the body, as well as the prejudices and misinformation that surround them. They are also led to explore the nature of their own wants, desires and role in society, as well as the role and responsibility of the adults around them and, what is and what is not acceptable. The show stresses the importance of family, and examines how friendships provide support and assistance in difficult times.

INTERMEDIATE PHASE

  • Study Area: Personal and Social Well-being (PSW)
  • Topic 1: Development of the self
  • Topic 2: Health and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Social responsibility

SENIOR PHASE:

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

Ubom! is back with THE WANGAI! directed by Andrew Buckland and Noxolo Donyeli. This Lorax-inspired story is a dazzling, clever and action-packed theatre adventure for the whole family! It is an electrically charged, zany, multi-coloured, and flavoursome story of friendship, difference, adventure and magic! Taking inspiration from Nobel Peace prize winner, Wangari Maathai, who spoke for the trees, Ubom! creates a little hero, “The Wangai”, who goes on an ecological adventure with the earnest desire to protect his luscious Eastern Cape habitat from an eager young entrepreneur whose eyes are too focused on ‘Commercial Success’ without regard for the extraordinary natural balance of the environment.

Germinating and growing out of local Eastern Cape history, ecology, culture and contemporary world views the result is a vibrant, exciting theatre work which can be accessed and enjoyed by children and adults from a wide range of cultural backgrounds.

And so the wondrous manipulation of language, rhythm, character and fantastical locale which so characterizes Dr Seuss’s work is honoured in a version of the story that offers the possibility of a world inhabited by people and creatures who care for each other and for the planet on which we depend.

Theatre 4 Youth