Puppet Park

‘Puppet Park’ is a newly written educational & musical production touching sensitive subjects regarding racism, homosexuality, family issues, abuse and bullying etc. Newly written songs will be added to assist with the message from stage. A message of love and acceptance. From the creative pen of Xander Steyn who has a list of productions that he has written, directed and choreographed – www.xanderartproductions.co.za – this is a production is a must see for every school and child in South Africa.

Play Structure

The piece will incorporate singing, dancing, acting and physical theatre. Its aim is to be edgy and very provocative in order to capture the pupil’s attention for the duration of the piece.

At the end of the piece the students will be given an opportunity to discuss some of the issues that they witnessed during the piece with a skilled facilitator.

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

Isihumane and Malume is an interactive clown performance using traditional storytelling and physical theatre to explore themes of HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Performed in either isiZulu or isiXhosa, Isihumane and Malume pushes the boundaries, taboos, and social norms about HIV/AIDS, gender, and violence against women through humour and laughter.

A long, long time ago there was a family that lived in a small village. They were very happy together in their little home. The father worked in the fields while the mother was busy at home cleaning and cooking. They had two daughters who were very helpful to their mother. The older ones name was Dema and the last born was Demazana….

When 5 clowns arrive in a school ready to tell a traditional South African story, “Dema and Demazane,” things turn upside down. They get lost in the story and discover that STIs, sugar daddies, gender norms and discrimination, and sexual violence are no laughing matter…

But in the face of all these difficult issues that affect us all so personally, how can we not but find humour in our common existence? As the clowns blunder through the story, climbing on top of and through each other, they discover that we all share common fears, misconceptions, and desires around sex and sexuality.

Isihumane and Malume approaches these issues and more through the power of laughter and play. The performance is provocative, insightful, and, as all Clowns Without Borders productions, disarmingly funny!

 

 

Look Before You Leap: Being Right deals with democracy, human rights, racism and discrimination.

Focussing in particular on the issues of diversity and inclusivity such as poverty, inequality, race, gender, language, age, and disability, discrimination on the basis of race, religion, culture, gender, sexuality, age, ability and language, as well as the concepts of institutionalised racism, xenophobia, and other forms of “othering”, are addressed.

The story pivots around the election of a school’s Student Representative Council. The Learners are introduced to the candidates standing for election, their motivation for running and each candidate’s aims and objectives outlined in their campaigns’. The Audience become the electorate, participating actively in the democratic processes that support and promote the promotion and advancement of the candidates, while simultaneously being privy to the ‘real’ experience of the identity, concerns and motivations of the characters.

Personal and individual needs are placed in a social context that encourages acceptance of diversity and fosters commitment to the values and principles entrenched in the Constitution. The show deals with social relationships and human rights and responsibilities, including how knowledge and understanding of diversity and inclusivity contributes to the development of responsible citizenship and social justice.

The aim is that audience will become (more) politically literate in terms of knowing, understanding and actively participating in democratic processes, both socially and politically. The importance of volunteerism, social service and involvement in a democratic society are emphasised, and the causes, consequences and prevention of pervasive social ills, such as HIV, and all forms of violence and abuse, are also addressed.

SENIOR PHASE (Grades 8 and 9)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

FET PHASE (Grade 10 – 12)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Democracy and human rights

A Girl Called Owl charts a friendship that starts in the heat of the Overberg summer between two ten-year-old girls, finding them again six years later. Olivia arrives in the town with her Dad; she is the new girl, the quiet girl, the weird girl. Then she meets Kay, the girl with the scar. Horwitz performs over ten characters, from the two young girls and their teenage counterparts to both their fathers and a group of boisterous men. Owl is a story about climbing trees, punching boys and kissing girls, touching sensitively, and not without humour, on issues including: coming of age – identity and choice; teen sexuality; homosexuality; domestic abuse; being/feeling different; friendship; love; violence – physical/implicit; changing relationships with authority figures/parents/teachers. The lead character is a girl so the play may be classed under ‘women’s issues’. However, the way in which she relates to the men in her environment, and they to her, makes this play important for men as well.

Written and directed by Jon Keevy, performed by Briony Horwitz, with staging by Fiona du Plooy and music composed for the show by Brydon Bolton, A Girl Called Owl premiered as Owl in 2012, receiving praise such as ‘Horwitz delivers an enchanting performance. Her versatility as an actress is astonishing…moving and evocative.” (Cape Times); “… beautifully observed…totally delicious …” (Megan’s Head) and four stars from the Cape Argus. Since then it has travelled all over SA and at the 2012 National Arts Festival it was invited to the Brighton and Prague Fringe festivals. At Brighton it gathered more praise, including two 5-star reviews and a nomination by Latest magazine as Best International Performance.

A barman, trapped by the codes of the bar that render him invisible; a flamboyantly macho cowboy, with a flair for the Argentine Tango; and a guarded woman, whose sensuous alter ego is released as she nurses her wine as if it were mother’s milk; all hover at the edge of existence, ever short of bridging the gaps between them.  The one minute they’re keeping time to the music, the next they’ve slipped out of the real time of their unfulfilled lives and into the vacuous space of the bar.  They flirt, fight, drink and forget, fuelled by the answers they find at the bottom of the glass.

This is a tale that shows the cruelty of life, and how if you don’t respect life or don’t have a direction, you will not succeed. It tackles themes like abortion, unprotected sex with multiple partners, peer pressure, irresponsible teenage parenting, school drop outs and the importance of education in life.

TACTICS is a collection of daring short plays written by young South African writers who have worked with The Framework.

Five short plays are performed by performers, they will play different parts, and the plays will be performed in a different order to create a completely new whole. In keeping with the Framework’s ethos, no two performances will be the same.

All the plays are multiply cast, allowing the actors to play different roles each time. Both actors and audience formulate relationships and meaning afresh at each showing. To this end, the actors have been Framework-trained, but not rehearsed, so that they have to thrash out their virgin choices before the audience.

The Framework’s team brings this new, totally edgy, intersection between text and performance in a style that demands the following of the performers: Play yourself, play the best part of yourself, don’t ever apologise and play to win.

Theatre 4 Youth