Thand’ Impilo

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

Objective
Creating a visual experience using CREATIVE ARTS and MAGIC to show easy examples of how to re-duce, re-use and up-cycle with objects found in the house. In doing that, the students will understand what these concepts are and why they are important. Using STORYTELLING AND  by giving them each materials that they can DESIGN  into an up-cycled creative art at home themselves, creates a full rounded and internal experience to inspire them to care for the earth.

 

About the Director:

Studying performing arts and teaching in drama at the Waterfront Theatre College, she taught drama at the Stellenbosch Waldorf School for 3 years and in 2016 she was a part of a programme called ‘Miss Earth South Africa’ and became one of 16 National finalists. At the end of the year she wrote a play called “The Recycling adventures of Reece”. A play that aims to inspire children and up lift them through storytelling and teaches them about taking care of the earth.

Details:
 
Limited 
amount
of students:   100
Price includes
(For each student): Materials to create an up-cycled design for themselves.  (There are options and depends on what each school prefers.)
Production runs once a year during the months of May and June.
 Vision statement: 
To create a sustainable difference and educate our children through storytelling, inspiring them to care for the earth so that they can have a greener future. 

Look Before You Leap: Being Right deals with democracy, human rights, racism and discrimination.

Focussing in particular on the issues of diversity and inclusivity such as poverty, inequality, race, gender, language, age, and disability, discrimination on the basis of race, religion, culture, gender, sexuality, age, ability and language, as well as the concepts of institutionalised racism, xenophobia, and other forms of “othering”, are addressed.

The story pivots around the election of a school’s Student Representative Council. The Learners are introduced to the candidates standing for election, their motivation for running and each candidate’s aims and objectives outlined in their campaigns’. The Audience become the electorate, participating actively in the democratic processes that support and promote the promotion and advancement of the candidates, while simultaneously being privy to the ‘real’ experience of the identity, concerns and motivations of the characters.

Personal and individual needs are placed in a social context that encourages acceptance of diversity and fosters commitment to the values and principles entrenched in the Constitution. The show deals with social relationships and human rights and responsibilities, including how knowledge and understanding of diversity and inclusivity contributes to the development of responsible citizenship and social justice.

The aim is that audience will become (more) politically literate in terms of knowing, understanding and actively participating in democratic processes, both socially and politically. The importance of volunteerism, social service and involvement in a democratic society are emphasised, and the causes, consequences and prevention of pervasive social ills, such as HIV, and all forms of violence and abuse, are also addressed.

SENIOR PHASE (Grades 8 and 9)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

FET PHASE (Grade 10 – 12)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Democracy and human rights

No Monkey Business: Safety First deals with basic safety, responsibility and trust.

Thandi has to go out on an errand. After teaching Mac and Vanda the rules of being alone and about strangers, she leaves. Needless to say the minute she’s gone Clarence Crocodile shows up disguised as a postman with a special surprise delivery for Mac. Fortunately, Mac manages to come to his senses just in time and Clarence’s little plot is foiled. But not for long, the ever persistent Clarence returns with a pizza, and this time he’s not taking no for an answer. But Mac is not that gullible – or is he? Instead, Clarence sells Mac some matches to cook himself supper – with predictable results. Fortunately Thandi comes home before the fire rages out of control.

This show examines the concepts of personal responsibility, personal safety and trust. It looks at the rules that we need to know in order to keep ourselves safe and why we have those rules. While dealing primarily with personal safety, the show also examines how to respond to unfamiliar people and situations, the notion of trust, and promotes looking after oneself and others. The intent is to foster the concepts of personal security and accountability for yourself and others.

The aims of the show are to leave the learner with a clear, sensible understanding of some of the more basic rules of daily life, a grasp of what responsibility and trust mean, and how to keep oneself, and others safe and out of harms way.
FOUNDATION PHASE
Study Area: Personal and Social Well-being

Social, emotional and environmental health
Relationships with other people and our environment
Values and attitudes
Nutrition
Diseases (HIV/AIDS)
Safety

Study Area: Creative Arts

Develop learners as creative, imaginative individuals
Provide basic knowledge and skills to participate creatively

About Us: Playing For Keeps follows two school friends whose carefree lives just got complicated. The class joker discovers that his sibling, who he thought was overseas, is actually in hospital with AIDS, and his personal search to try to come to terms with and understand it – bringing his family back together in the process. Meanwhile his pretty classmate is overwhelmed by the attentions of an older boy, who showers her with company, and gifts, and attention – but what does he want in exchange?

Through the course of the action the audience is introduced to HIV and AIDS and Tuberculosis; how they affect the body, as well as the prejudices and misinformation that surround them. They are also led to explore the nature of their own wants, desires and role in society, as well as the role and responsibility of the adults around them and, what is and what is not acceptable. The show stresses the importance of family, and examines how friendships provide support and assistance in difficult times.

INTERMEDIATE PHASE

  • Study Area: Personal and Social Well-being (PSW)
  • Topic 1: Development of the self
  • Topic 2: Health and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Social responsibility

SENIOR PHASE:

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

A Girl Called Owl charts a friendship that starts in the heat of the Overberg summer between two ten-year-old girls, finding them again six years later. Olivia arrives in the town with her Dad; she is the new girl, the quiet girl, the weird girl. Then she meets Kay, the girl with the scar. Horwitz performs over ten characters, from the two young girls and their teenage counterparts to both their fathers and a group of boisterous men. Owl is a story about climbing trees, punching boys and kissing girls, touching sensitively, and not without humour, on issues including: coming of age – identity and choice; teen sexuality; homosexuality; domestic abuse; being/feeling different; friendship; love; violence – physical/implicit; changing relationships with authority figures/parents/teachers. The lead character is a girl so the play may be classed under ‘women’s issues’. However, the way in which she relates to the men in her environment, and they to her, makes this play important for men as well.

Written and directed by Jon Keevy, performed by Briony Horwitz, with staging by Fiona du Plooy and music composed for the show by Brydon Bolton, A Girl Called Owl premiered as Owl in 2012, receiving praise such as ‘Horwitz delivers an enchanting performance. Her versatility as an actress is astonishing…moving and evocative.” (Cape Times); “… beautifully observed…totally delicious …” (Megan’s Head) and four stars from the Cape Argus. Since then it has travelled all over SA and at the 2012 National Arts Festival it was invited to the Brighton and Prague Fringe festivals. At Brighton it gathered more praise, including two 5-star reviews and a nomination by Latest magazine as Best International Performance.

Witness a day in the life of Norman. Using graphic mime, vocal effects and physical clowning, “Norman” is a light-hearted, fun-filled, simple yet bizarre adventure of one man’s humble struggle against the universe which conspires to make his life difficult.

Created and performed by Richard Antrobus

Written by Clinton Marius and directed by Mpume Mthombeni, this is a heartwarming story about a young Zulu herdboy who learns that the little calf he loves is to become a gift for the king. It is about Nguni cattle and their role in African society, growing up, honesty, and doing the right thing.

The production is available in English or isiZulu, as a puppet show, and also as a stand-alone reading.

Non-verbal Family performance for children from 4+

Created, directed and performed by Jori Snell/ Baba Yaga Theatre

Review at NAF 2012 ‘Tonite’:

Kitchen Fables in a Cookie Jar is as much of an adventure… It’s a sophisticated piece of theatre-work for kids, set in a kitchen, showing us the dreams of one little girl. Assitej’s mission is to encourage the creation of good theatre for children and youth, and Kitchen Fables in a Cookie Jar fits right in with that idea.’

Those of you looking for a creative experience that is intriguing, innovative and slightly disturbing-all in one go, should look no further than award winning physical theatre performer Jori Snell, and her latest work, “Kitchen Fables in a Cookie Jar”, which captivates both young and old audiences through a delightful mix of sound, visual and movement theatre.

Kitchen Fables in A Cookie Jar”, has a subtle similarity to Alice in Wonderland. It is about a girl’s discovery in a not quite ordinary kitchen, where kitchen tools and ingredients come alive and transform into imaginary friends, or weird, sometimes grotesque creatures of her own fantasy. It is set in the kind of magica/realistic landscapes we get to explore in our dreams.

This non-verbal family performance is theatre for the senses. It creates magical pictures of flying objects, colored lights, enchanting sounds and delicious smells. As the girl’s fantasy spins around, ordinary things are being transformed into living stories and creatures that blur the borders between fantasy and reality.

Her journeys through dreamy landscapes give way for a gradual understanding of what play and friendship can bring in times of solitude and being lost. Combining physical storytelling, dance, music and visual imagery, this performance speaks to the playful, at times cruel imagination of children and adults alike.

This piece aims at playing to children’s imaginative intelligence, creating visual and emotional landscapes, very much like in a dream, letting one association follow the other.

Coming from an intensive touring children-theatre background in Denmark, Jori Snell aspires to bring imaginative, different and cutting-edge theatre to children in various schools and informal settlements in and around Cape Town, and to collaborate with organizations such as Assitej and Theatre Arts Admin Collective, to build up a strong platform for high, qualitative children theatre in SA.

In a very hot country a man lived with his wife and son, Slindelo, in a little hut, which was surrounded by grass and flowers. They were all perfectly happy till Slindelo stopped helping around the hut and started playing dirty tricks on everyone.

Theatre 4 Youth