Die Rommelkoningin

The magic key sends Kalla on an adventure to the Litter Queen’s palace. He meets her two side-kicks, Rat and Poison, and experiences what it feels like when litter is not picked up, but thrown around. The audience helps the action along, by finding key words that are placed around the auditorium. A fun, literacy adventure!

Play Structure

The piece will incorporate singing, dancing, acting and physical theatre. Its aim is to be edgy and very provocative in order to capture the pupil’s attention for the duration of the piece.

At the end of the piece the students will be given an opportunity to discuss some of the issues that they witnessed during the piece with a skilled facilitator.

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

JTC has created 2 versions of this production i.e storytelling and street theatre. With a cast of 7 the latter version is a visual street theatre piece and uses daring stilt characterizations, animal masks, original music and Nama language. The storytelling version has 3 characters who portray hilarious frogs who lead the animals to discover their own talents and to stand up to the bully. The storytellers continuously link the folktale to the language, the culture & history of the Khoikhoi as well as to their personal experiences. Insights into the behaviour of humans and wild animals are revealed. Both versions make use of English, Afrikaans & Nama (Khoikhoi language).

When Lion Had Wings is 40 minutes in duration with the storytelling version most suitable for Grades 4-7 whereas the street theatre version is fun for the whole family.

When Lion Had Wings, was developed during the course of 2016 and made its debut at the Cape Town Fringe Festival and was subsequently performed at the Muizenberg Festival as part of Project Ripple; the Cape Town Embrace event in celebration of Universal Children’s Day; at Streetopia and at the Vrygrond Festival.  During February 2017  the street theatre version was performed as part of JTC’s Our Beaches Our Stories project which brought public art performances to public recreational spaces i.e. Monwabisi, Strandfontein and Muizenberg Pavilions, promoting natural and cultural heritage. The storytelling version toured local primary schools during November of 2016, was performed at the Masque Theatre early December and toured the Northern Cape at the start of March 2017.

Playtime Antics is a nonverbal clown performance for children of all ages.

In theatre one of the more impactful styles of performance is that of ‘Clowning‘. Clowning enables the performer to stay centred on the audience, being accessible to them so that he in turn can open up to them and their energy. This informs his performance, ensuring true impact.

This style together with a non-verbal presentation also asks both performer and audience member ‘to listen with their eyes’, essentially employing other sensory mechanisms in understanding and comprehending – delivering what has been hailed a truly unique and enriching theatre experience

With this year’s performance, we will be exploring relationships on the playground…relationships which we seem to encounter in adulthood as well and therefore an all to pertinent theme to explore … is it possible to form and maintain meaningful relationships regardless of our differences…can the bully, the shy girl and the smart boy in class be friends?

 

Once Upon a Fire is a dance and story-telling production aimed at children and families. 3 Performers will delve into the treasure trove of stories from our continent and beyond and weave them together into a new story, celebrated in dance. This cross-disciplinary production combines dance, traditional storytelling, object play, vocal mis-en-scene, physical characterisation and comedy.

Look Before You Leap: Being Right deals with democracy, human rights, racism and discrimination.

Focussing in particular on the issues of diversity and inclusivity such as poverty, inequality, race, gender, language, age, and disability, discrimination on the basis of race, religion, culture, gender, sexuality, age, ability and language, as well as the concepts of institutionalised racism, xenophobia, and other forms of “othering”, are addressed.

The story pivots around the election of a school’s Student Representative Council. The Learners are introduced to the candidates standing for election, their motivation for running and each candidate’s aims and objectives outlined in their campaigns’. The Audience become the electorate, participating actively in the democratic processes that support and promote the promotion and advancement of the candidates, while simultaneously being privy to the ‘real’ experience of the identity, concerns and motivations of the characters.

Personal and individual needs are placed in a social context that encourages acceptance of diversity and fosters commitment to the values and principles entrenched in the Constitution. The show deals with social relationships and human rights and responsibilities, including how knowledge and understanding of diversity and inclusivity contributes to the development of responsible citizenship and social justice.

The aim is that audience will become (more) politically literate in terms of knowing, understanding and actively participating in democratic processes, both socially and politically. The importance of volunteerism, social service and involvement in a democratic society are emphasised, and the causes, consequences and prevention of pervasive social ills, such as HIV, and all forms of violence and abuse, are also addressed.

SENIOR PHASE (Grades 8 and 9)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

FET PHASE (Grade 10 – 12)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Democracy and human rights

No Monkey Business: Safety First deals with basic safety, responsibility and trust.

Thandi has to go out on an errand. After teaching Mac and Vanda the rules of being alone and about strangers, she leaves. Needless to say the minute she’s gone Clarence Crocodile shows up disguised as a postman with a special surprise delivery for Mac. Fortunately, Mac manages to come to his senses just in time and Clarence’s little plot is foiled. But not for long, the ever persistent Clarence returns with a pizza, and this time he’s not taking no for an answer. But Mac is not that gullible – or is he? Instead, Clarence sells Mac some matches to cook himself supper – with predictable results. Fortunately Thandi comes home before the fire rages out of control.

This show examines the concepts of personal responsibility, personal safety and trust. It looks at the rules that we need to know in order to keep ourselves safe and why we have those rules. While dealing primarily with personal safety, the show also examines how to respond to unfamiliar people and situations, the notion of trust, and promotes looking after oneself and others. The intent is to foster the concepts of personal security and accountability for yourself and others.

The aims of the show are to leave the learner with a clear, sensible understanding of some of the more basic rules of daily life, a grasp of what responsibility and trust mean, and how to keep oneself, and others safe and out of harms way.
FOUNDATION PHASE
Study Area: Personal and Social Well-being

Social, emotional and environmental health
Relationships with other people and our environment
Values and attitudes
Nutrition
Diseases (HIV/AIDS)
Safety

Study Area: Creative Arts

Develop learners as creative, imaginative individuals
Provide basic knowledge and skills to participate creatively

First published in 1945, the production tells the timeless classic novel’s story; with a uniquely South African slant to ensure it has relevance and topicality for contemporary audiences.

Animal Farm has recently been selected as a nominee for the Naledi Awards Showcase organized by Assitej at the Soweto Theatre in October 2014.

Growing up in rural area a young man known by his nick name “The Shoe Man” take us through a journey that may change the lives of South African youth today. He is forced to attend high school in a closest town, since he is waiting for the government to build one in his area. Passionate about completing his matric, he struggles to survive through depressions posed by children from his community and settling his fees at his multiracial school.  (The play is dedicated to the late Andile “King, Jesus” Mdletshe)

Theatre 4 Youth