My silence is talkative

Mphilo is a country teenage, who is born as a blessing in the eyes of the family because she has albinism. Her grandmother believes that she can cure the disease her older daughter has and that Mphilo’s body parts can make the family rich. Mpilo and her mother, Nozizwe, journey to confront the myths that allow young girls to be exploited, harassed and abused by authority figures in our communities. United they can reach beyond the wall of society’s myths. Nozizwe meets up with other women from different backgrounds and through Mphilo’s journey, they are able to better articulate their own struggles. Dlamini brings her strong directorial and aesthetic signature to the work, which does not employ the use of set, but rather uses the performers’ movement and bodies to give shape to the drama.

 

‘Puppet Park’ is a newly written educational & musical production touching sensitive subjects regarding racism, homosexuality, family issues, abuse and bullying etc. Newly written songs will be added to assist with the message from stage. A message of love and acceptance. From the creative pen of Xander Steyn who has a list of productions that he has written, directed and choreographed – www.xanderartproductions.co.za – this is a production is a must see for every school and child in South Africa.

Jade Bowers (2016 Standard Bank Young Artist, Naledi Theatre Awards Best Director for Scorched) and Ameera Patel (Naledi Theatre Awards Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Scorched) join forces to present ‘Black’. Based on CA Davids’ 2014 novel ‘The Blacks of Cape Town’, Gold Standard Bank Ovation Award-winning writer/director Penny Youngleson has written an adaptation for stage which intricately balances the poetry and pain of discovery, of unpacking history and the drama of family politics. Accomplished actress Patel tackles her first one-hander, under the directorial hand of Bowers, and with musical composition and accompaniment by Daniel Geddes.

While based abroad, historian Zara Black (Patel) learns via an officious but vague letter from the South African government, that documents once sealed and implicating her father in an act (which, while not clearly defined, was committed against the anti-apartheid movement decades earlier) will soon be released to the public. The resultant unearthing of her own past begins with Isaiah Black – the grandfather that ‘started it all’ when he stole a handful of diamonds from one of the world’s largest diamond mines in Kimberley. This act, however, is overshadowed by what the family considers his far greater crime – concealing his (mixed) race to escape the harsh realities of the mines before abandoning his mother and ultimately changing his name. His choice of surname is not without irony; because having been classified as mixed, he had passed as white, but had given rise to a line of coloured children and grandchildren. His granddaughter Zara finds herself alone and displaced in New Jersey, caught up in the excitement of an American election of a new and historic president, while trying to make sense of South Africa of the past and present: constructing a history for herself and her family from fragmented recollections and family lore.

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

The Whale Show is a family production that uses a large puppetry to enlighten and entertain the audience. The two protagonists have spent so much time with whales they behave just like them and even speak whale language, sharing their awe and wonder of these magical creatures. Themes include similarities and differences between whales and humans, threats to whales and whale facts and figures. The audience is encouraged to think critically about their values and the importance of whale conservation when the audience is invited to stop the giant harpoon.

The Whale Show is 45 minutes in duration and is suitable for Grades R – 3. An accompanying drama skills workshop of 45 minutes is also available.

After a 3 year hiatus The Whale Show, based on Heathcote Williams’ ‘Whale Nation’, returned to the stage in 2011 opening with a run at Kalk Bay Theatre. Created in 2001, the play has toured the National Arts Festival; Out The box festival, the Whale Festival in Hermanus; and numerous schools as part of International Fund for Animal Welfare’s (IFAW) outreach education and awareness campaigns including twinning programmes with underprivileged and privileged schools. It has also been included in the YES programme for Marine Week and enjoyed successful public runs in Knysna, Plettenberg Bay and Muizenberg in 2008. In October 2015 The Whale Show traveled to the Overstrand region where it was performed for learners from local schools. The show was last performed at the City of Cape Town, Biodiversity Management Staff at their year end function in November 2016.

Look Before You Leap: Being Right deals with democracy, human rights, racism and discrimination.

Focussing in particular on the issues of diversity and inclusivity such as poverty, inequality, race, gender, language, age, and disability, discrimination on the basis of race, religion, culture, gender, sexuality, age, ability and language, as well as the concepts of institutionalised racism, xenophobia, and other forms of “othering”, are addressed.

The story pivots around the election of a school’s Student Representative Council. The Learners are introduced to the candidates standing for election, their motivation for running and each candidate’s aims and objectives outlined in their campaigns’. The Audience become the electorate, participating actively in the democratic processes that support and promote the promotion and advancement of the candidates, while simultaneously being privy to the ‘real’ experience of the identity, concerns and motivations of the characters.

Personal and individual needs are placed in a social context that encourages acceptance of diversity and fosters commitment to the values and principles entrenched in the Constitution. The show deals with social relationships and human rights and responsibilities, including how knowledge and understanding of diversity and inclusivity contributes to the development of responsible citizenship and social justice.

The aim is that audience will become (more) politically literate in terms of knowing, understanding and actively participating in democratic processes, both socially and politically. The importance of volunteerism, social service and involvement in a democratic society are emphasised, and the causes, consequences and prevention of pervasive social ills, such as HIV, and all forms of violence and abuse, are also addressed.

SENIOR PHASE (Grades 8 and 9)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

FET PHASE (Grade 10 – 12)

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Democracy and human rights

About Us: Playing For Keeps follows two school friends whose carefree lives just got complicated. The class joker discovers that his sibling, who he thought was overseas, is actually in hospital with AIDS, and his personal search to try to come to terms with and understand it – bringing his family back together in the process. Meanwhile his pretty classmate is overwhelmed by the attentions of an older boy, who showers her with company, and gifts, and attention – but what does he want in exchange?

Through the course of the action the audience is introduced to HIV and AIDS and Tuberculosis; how they affect the body, as well as the prejudices and misinformation that surround them. They are also led to explore the nature of their own wants, desires and role in society, as well as the role and responsibility of the adults around them and, what is and what is not acceptable. The show stresses the importance of family, and examines how friendships provide support and assistance in difficult times.

INTERMEDIATE PHASE

  • Study Area: Personal and Social Well-being (PSW)
  • Topic 1: Development of the self
  • Topic 2: Health and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Social responsibility

SENIOR PHASE:

  • Topic 1: Development of the self in society
  • Topic 2: Health, social and environmental responsibility
  • Topic 3: Constitutional rights and responsibilities

Presented by Here Manje and KB Theatre Productions.

Choreography by Cleo Notcutt and Nhlanhla Mkhwanazi.
Resident photographer and cinematographer: Dex Goodman.

Once upon a time, a boy named Tommy who lived an unadventurous life was presented by a challenge from the new kid at school – join us on an adventure of the imagination and magic. Come see Tommy’s journey to becoming a hero.

The Incredible Journey premiered at Fringe World 2015 in Perth, Western Australia. The show received a Standard Bank Ovation Award at the 2015 National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, South Africa.

First published in 1945, the production tells the timeless classic novel’s story; with a uniquely South African slant to ensure it has relevance and topicality for contemporary audiences.

Animal Farm has recently been selected as a nominee for the Naledi Awards Showcase organized by Assitej at the Soweto Theatre in October 2014.

Theatre 4 Youth