The Cloud-Catcher

Emily Jade was no ordinary child…

She was shy and timid but adventurous and wild.

She was odd-looking, unpopular but also quite smart,

Despite failing Science, Geography, Maths, History & Art.

You see, Emily could not stay focused – a major flaw –

She never stopped daydreaming – not ever, at all.

Young Emily, who always ‘has her head in the clouds’, decides to take up the challenge of ending the drought once and for all. She invents a marvellous machine which she flies across the African continent in search of rain clouds.

Physical theatre (Avril Cummins) combines with ‘documentary-style’ video footage, a simple, creative set, and heaps of imagination. This educational and whimsical fantasy delivers a strong message of hope, resilience and empowerment.

“The Cloud Catcher” has been performed across South Africa, including at the Assitej World Conference (2017), entertaining and educating young audiences about the drought affecting much of the country.

Performed by Avril Cummins

Nina has just woken from a bad dream. Or was it a dream? Either way, she can’t fall back asleep in case it comes back. But it’s bedtime now and the dark is making her feel strange, too… How is she going to navigate through this dark night and the nightmare stuck in her head?

Night Light uses live music, video projection, shadows, light-play and live performance to explore a night in the life of Nina, a young girl trying to deal with the thoughts and feelings which are haunting her as she lies in bed. The play evokes those moments when we feel alone: afraid of the dark, or going through life changes and unable to express ourselves. Aimed at 9-12 year olds who are at a delicate time, caught between the expectations of growing up and still haunted by childhood fears, this magical and mysterious piece encourages children to listen to their inner voice.

Generously supported by the National Lotteries Commission, Well Worn Theatre Company proudly present their latest production for young audiences. ‘Galela‘ is a thirst-quenching new play about a community deeply affected by our country´s water issues.

Splash! Splutter! Then shhhhhh… Only ripples left. Would you dive in next?

Three best friends bravely embark on a project to make their town´s drinking water safe again. They soon discover, however, that they have waded into hot water and that the problems affecting the town dam are deeper and murkier than at first glance. Still determined to make a difference and to secure the future of their friends and family, the trio dive in to fix the mess, proving in spectacular fashion that children with the biggest imaginations will save the world.

Nationally acclaimed eco-education company, Well Worn Theatre, proudly present the latest production in their three-year touring play programme generously funded by the National Lotteries Commission. ´Galela´ is the thirst-quenching story of a small community deeply affected by our country’s water issues. Directed by multi-award winning Thembela Madliki (‘Nyanga’ NAF 2016 and ‘Bayephi’ NAF 2017), ‘Galela’ features the energetic physical theatre talents of Lerato Sefoloshe, Mlindeli Emmanuel and Tebogo Machaba, and is geared for children aged 7 to 12, though parents, teachers and older siblings will also enjoy this epic adventure play!

An IsiXhosa name meaning ‘pour’, ‘Galela’ is the thirst-quenching story of a small community deeply affected by drought. The show dives head first into the deep end of the serious water issues affecting our country, and though geared for children aged 7 to 12, this epic adventure play will whet all peoples creative appetites, and also refresh or fill ALL South Africans with some much needed, every day, water-saving tips. ‘Galela’ premieres at the 2018 National Arts Festival followed by a tour to primary schools and festivals across South Africa, in the aim to entertain, educate, and imaginatively engage learners and audiences about issues of drought, water consumption and water pollution.

To book a performance of ´Galela´for your school, organisation or event, please email wellworntheatre@nullgmail.com or call Kyla on 0767152414

Poster Image by Ellen Heydenrych (Hey_Ellen Illustrations)

A surreal and larger than life outdoor performance tells the story of a girl through movement and dance. Hiding in a tree house, she cries herself to sleep and dreams the sounds of her garden, which turn into music. She dreams of two old giant butterflies dancing a dance of love. The male catches the pregnant female’s eggs and hangs them on a leaf where they hatch and grow into giant caterpillars. A hungry black crow is hunting and the haunted girl wakes up inside her dream to challenge the predator and protect the miracle of life.

Butterfly Dreams is the creation of Jungle Theatre Company’s Laduma Jungle team and was developed as the final part of a National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund funded trained programme. It was directed by Vincent Meyburgh with set and costume design by Monique Fagan of Junkanew. Through the actors’ involvement in choreography, writing, composing, designing and making, Butterfly Dreams fosters a closer link between the actors’ experience, characters’ stories, the music and creation of images. The production was performed as community event at the start of the school holidays in December 2011. It was partly commissioned for the KKNK in 2012 and was staged at a number of festivals during 2012 i.e. Khayelitsha Cocktale Festival, International Kite Festival, Harfield Village Carnival and Hout Bay Green Faire. With funding received from the National Arts Council and Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport the show was recently re-developed during 2015 and performed in Muizenberg early December 2015 and the Company Gardens in March 2016. During February 2017  Butterfly Dreams was performed as part of JTC’s Our Beaches Our Stories project which brought public art performances to public recreational spaces i.e. Monwabisi, Strandfontein and Muizenberg Pavilions, promoting natural and cultural heritage.

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

The Whale Show is a family production that uses a large puppetry to enlighten and entertain the audience. The two protagonists have spent so much time with whales they behave just like them and even speak whale language, sharing their awe and wonder of these magical creatures. Themes include similarities and differences between whales and humans, threats to whales and whale facts and figures. The audience is encouraged to think critically about their values and the importance of whale conservation when the audience is invited to stop the giant harpoon.

The Whale Show is 45 minutes in duration and is suitable for Grades R – 3. An accompanying drama skills workshop of 45 minutes is also available.

After a 3 year hiatus The Whale Show, based on Heathcote Williams’ ‘Whale Nation’, returned to the stage in 2011 opening with a run at Kalk Bay Theatre. Created in 2001, the play has toured the National Arts Festival; Out The box festival, the Whale Festival in Hermanus; and numerous schools as part of International Fund for Animal Welfare’s (IFAW) outreach education and awareness campaigns including twinning programmes with underprivileged and privileged schools. It has also been included in the YES programme for Marine Week and enjoyed successful public runs in Knysna, Plettenberg Bay and Muizenberg in 2008. In October 2015 The Whale Show traveled to the Overstrand region where it was performed for learners from local schools. The show was last performed at the City of Cape Town, Biodiversity Management Staff at their year end function in November 2016.

Once Upon a Fire is a dance and story-telling production aimed at children and families. 3 Performers will delve into the treasure trove of stories from our continent and beyond and weave them together into a new story, celebrated in dance. This cross-disciplinary production combines dance, traditional storytelling, object play, vocal mis-en-scene, physical characterisation and comedy.

Growing up in rural area a young man known by his nick name “The Shoe Man” take us through a journey that may change the lives of South African youth today. He is forced to attend high school in a closest town, since he is waiting for the government to build one in his area. Passionate about completing his matric, he struggles to survive through depressions posed by children from his community and settling his fees at his multiracial school.  (The play is dedicated to the late Andile “King, Jesus” Mdletshe)

Emperor Loxly’s court is in turmoil, because his designer quit the day before his birthday, and left His Highness without a new show-stopper outfit. That is, however not the only problem. The much bigger issue is Wonty, the unenthusiastic court jester, who stole the emperor’s prized watch, and is planning to take over the kingdom. The emperor’s loyal servant, Wilma, tries to maintain the status quo: keeping Loxly happy and Wonty quiet, but then Wonty is banned, Loxly almost loses his mind, and a stranger makes his appearance. Can the smooth talking, never-heard-of designer called Wontier, save the day?

In the workshop, learners evaluate all the characters in the play, and decide who displayed good leadership skills. They also apply it to their own environment and lives.

 

Theatre 4 Youth