Die Rommelkoningin

The magic key sends Kalla on an adventure to the Litter Queen’s palace. He meets her two side-kicks, Rat and Poison, and experiences what it feels like when litter is not picked up, but thrown around. The audience helps the action along, by finding key words that are placed around the auditorium. A fun, literacy adventure!

Jade Bowers (2016 Standard Bank Young Artist, Naledi Theatre Awards Best Director for Scorched) and Ameera Patel (Naledi Theatre Awards Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Scorched) join forces to present ‘Black’. Based on CA Davids’ 2014 novel ‘The Blacks of Cape Town’, Gold Standard Bank Ovation Award-winning writer/director Penny Youngleson has written an adaptation for stage which intricately balances the poetry and pain of discovery, of unpacking history and the drama of family politics. Accomplished actress Patel tackles her first one-hander, under the directorial hand of Bowers, and with musical composition and accompaniment by Daniel Geddes.

While based abroad, historian Zara Black (Patel) learns via an officious but vague letter from the South African government, that documents once sealed and implicating her father in an act (which, while not clearly defined, was committed against the anti-apartheid movement decades earlier) will soon be released to the public. The resultant unearthing of her own past begins with Isaiah Black – the grandfather that ‘started it all’ when he stole a handful of diamonds from one of the world’s largest diamond mines in Kimberley. This act, however, is overshadowed by what the family considers his far greater crime – concealing his (mixed) race to escape the harsh realities of the mines before abandoning his mother and ultimately changing his name. His choice of surname is not without irony; because having been classified as mixed, he had passed as white, but had given rise to a line of coloured children and grandchildren. His granddaughter Zara finds herself alone and displaced in New Jersey, caught up in the excitement of an American election of a new and historic president, while trying to make sense of South Africa of the past and present: constructing a history for herself and her family from fragmented recollections and family lore.

Londoloza is a South African childrens’ play that tackles nature and water conservation. The show is an awareness of how can save water, use it in a responsible manner and the show also looks at the various things that effect our environment such as littering and pollution. All of which are linked to wasting and polluting water. The show is comprised of 4 actors, who use dance, singing and puppetry in order to get the narrative across. The show encourages recycling and informs its audience on the various methods there are to recycle or re-use items instead of littering or throwing them away. Thabo and Namhla are childhood friends who love their community and find various ways of saving water and taking care of the environment. Mabutho and Makapisi are the community rebel children who do not care about preserving water and the environment. They are rude and bully Thabo and Namhla every time they try to do something good for their community. It is not until Mabutho and Makapisi ruin the whole environment and wastes all the community’s water, that they get a wakeup call and finally turn their lives around after seeing the effects of not taking care of their environment and water. This show is highly interactive and allows the children to be part of the story so that they are actively involved in the development of the story. The cast will ask the audience questions and at various intervals ask some of the audience to come up on stage to help the characters in the show with whatever they need at the time. This show will run for 30 minutes and at the end the cast as well as the audience (teachers are also welcome)will have a brief questions and answers session after the show to unpack some of the things that came up in the play.

The show looks at the never ending battle between the queens wives, the disruptive lack of modesty in the laymen, the bad luck that seems to follow the heir and the laughable bad decisions made by the king’s close friends. This seeks to show the similarities between the king and queens and the so called commoner, the most evident similarity being the chaos that comes with the every day life. So maybe we are all kings and queens with our portion of chaos?

The traditional African stories are told using physical and vocal gestures to elevate and honor the ancient art of oral tradition. The storyteller, the bare stage and the graceful gestures will take audiences on imaginative trips across the African continent, moving from Nigeria to Lesotho and every place in between.

The show uses storytelling to relate the ancient and not commonly known history of the roots of the South African people. History of SA: Quick-Quick One Time! locates the different cultures through the various provinces, giving the learners an in to geography, taking them through celebration ceremonies, ancient art, music and celebrates the South African languages. The show in its current incarnation is suitable for learners from the age of 3 to 7, but can be crafted and extended according to the schools specifications to be suitable for ages between 3 – 13, elaborating more on the different aspects of cultures, ranging from cuisine to traditional garb, to current dynamics (i.e. a modern South Africa in which citizens are not bound to their homelands but move freely in the country to find employment, to marry into different cultures) and to widen their knowledge of their country. The piece is interactive therefore smaller groups of between 20 to 25 children are ideal, however the piece can be crafted for larger groups with less interaction and more storytelling.

Does anyone have any idea what the impact of the pandemic of HIV and AIDS is having on our children and their family life? How does one approach this sensitive subject? Did you know that a live theatre show like, Tand’ Impilo can open up a safe space to discuss the subject and this forum can save lives?

Objective
Creating a visual experience using CREATIVE ARTS and MAGIC to show easy examples of how to re-duce, re-use and up-cycle with objects found in the house. In doing that, the students will understand what these concepts are and why they are important. Using STORYTELLING AND  by giving them each materials that they can DESIGN  into an up-cycled creative art at home themselves, creates a full rounded and internal experience to inspire them to care for the earth.

 

About the Director:

Studying performing arts and teaching in drama at the Waterfront Theatre College, she taught drama at the Stellenbosch Waldorf School for 3 years and in 2016 she was a part of a programme called ‘Miss Earth South Africa’ and became one of 16 National finalists. At the end of the year she wrote a play called “The Recycling adventures of Reece”. A play that aims to inspire children and up lift them through storytelling and teaches them about taking care of the earth.

Details:
 
Limited 
amount
of students:   100
Price includes
(For each student): Materials to create an up-cycled design for themselves.  (There are options and depends on what each school prefers.)
Production runs once a year during the months of May and June.
 Vision statement: 
To create a sustainable difference and educate our children through storytelling, inspiring them to care for the earth so that they can have a greener future. 

JTC has created 2 versions of this production i.e storytelling and street theatre. With a cast of 7 the latter version is a visual street theatre piece and uses daring stilt characterizations, animal masks, original music and Nama language. The storytelling version has 3 characters who portray hilarious frogs who lead the animals to discover their own talents and to stand up to the bully. The storytellers continuously link the folktale to the language, the culture & history of the Khoikhoi as well as to their personal experiences. Insights into the behaviour of humans and wild animals are revealed. Both versions make use of English, Afrikaans & Nama (Khoikhoi language).

When Lion Had Wings is 40 minutes in duration with the storytelling version most suitable for Grades 4-7 whereas the street theatre version is fun for the whole family.

When Lion Had Wings, was developed during the course of 2016 and made its debut at the Cape Town Fringe Festival and was subsequently performed at the Muizenberg Festival as part of Project Ripple; the Cape Town Embrace event in celebration of Universal Children’s Day; at Streetopia and at the Vrygrond Festival.  During February 2017  the street theatre version was performed as part of JTC’s Our Beaches Our Stories project which brought public art performances to public recreational spaces i.e. Monwabisi, Strandfontein and Muizenberg Pavilions, promoting natural and cultural heritage. The storytelling version toured local primary schools during November of 2016, was performed at the Masque Theatre early December and toured the Northern Cape at the start of March 2017.

6 actors, 5 acts, 75 minutes, 6 puppets and 3 masks – Brett Goldin Bursary winner, Nkosinathi Gaar, uses his training with the Royal Shakespeare Company and experience with The Handspring Puppet Company to take the famed ‘Scottish Play’ to a new level and new audience. A young, exciting cast bring refreshing energy to the well-known play.

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Theatre 4 Youth