Dude! Wa’s My Phone?

“Dude! Wa’s My Phone?” is designed for high school students from Grade 10 to Grade 12 who are enrolled in Dramatic Arts. This age group is our main target audience, given the themes’ relatability, the cultural insights it offers, and its ability to captivate and educate a demographic highly connected to the challenges and opportunities associated with digital technology.

The play provides valuable insights and raises awareness about the consequences of smartphone addiction. Our interactive story creates an environment where young audiences are more receptive to messages encouraging a healthier balance between online and offline life.

“Dude! Wa’s My Phone?” utilizes humour, drama, and relatable situations to engage learners in a contemplative exploration of the role of technology in our lives. It delves into its impact on relationships, social consciousness, and the intricacies and absurdities that arise in the digital age. The production addresses the contemporary issue of smartphone addiction, examining the following themes:

 

  • Addiction and Dependence on Technology

  • Friendship and Connection

  • The Intersection of Comedy and Tragedy

  • Identity and Sense of Self

  • Spark Dialogue and Reflection

The award-winning show documents the spirited misadventures of a Grade 9 Afrikaans underdog and her crucial survival-advice, as a minority in an Anglophile high school. Pretina de Jager will offer expert tips on how to: hashtag like a celeb, crush the mean girl mafia, and twerk your way through teen angst.

 

JUL 03 19:30
05 19:30
06 19:30
07 19:30

Mphilo is a country teenage, who is born as a blessing in the eyes of the family because she has albinism. Her grandmother believes that she can cure the disease her older daughter has and that Mphilo’s body parts can make the family rich. Mpilo and her mother, Nozizwe, journey to confront the myths that allow young girls to be exploited, harassed and abused by authority figures in our communities. United they can reach beyond the wall of society’s myths. Nozizwe meets up with other women from different backgrounds and through Mphilo’s journey, they are able to better articulate their own struggles. Dlamini brings her strong directorial and aesthetic signature to the work, which does not employ the use of set, but rather uses the performers’ movement and bodies to give shape to the drama.

 

Emily Jade was no ordinary child…

She was shy and timid but adventurous and wild.

She was odd-looking, unpopular but also quite smart,

Despite failing Science, Geography, Maths, History & Art.

You see, Emily could not stay focused – a major flaw –

She never stopped daydreaming – not ever, at all.

Young Emily, who always ‘has her head in the clouds’, decides to take up the challenge of ending the drought once and for all. She invents a marvellous machine which she flies across the African continent in search of rain clouds.

Physical theatre (Avril Cummins) combines with ‘documentary-style’ video footage, a simple, creative set, and heaps of imagination. This educational and whimsical fantasy delivers a strong message of hope, resilience and empowerment.

“The Cloud Catcher” has been performed across South Africa, including at the Assitej World Conference (2017), entertaining and educating young audiences about the drought affecting much of the country.

Performed by Avril Cummins

A story of loss, love and hope. A young girl is missing. A distraught mother searches for her and the brother is locked in the house to keep him safe. The community rallies together and the hilarious neighbour joins the search.

This show is dedicated to all the missing children in our country.

Die towersleutel neem vir Kalla, Biebie, Vlooi en Flappie op ‘n avontuur na ‘n bos waar die singende, kokende Draak woon. Flappie beland in haar kloue, en amper in haar pot! Leerders sien bekende lees-woorde op die verhoog as deel van die rekwisiete, en word op ‘n interaktiewe manier bekendgestel aan basiese teater-terme.

The magic key sends Kalla on an adventure to the Litter Queen’s palace. He meets her two side-kicks, Rat and Poison, and experiences what it feels like when litter is not picked up, but thrown around. The audience helps the action along, by finding key words that are placed around the auditorium. A fun, literacy adventure!

‘Puppet Park’ is a newly written educational & musical production touching sensitive subjects regarding racism, homosexuality, family issues, abuse and bullying etc. Newly written songs will be added to assist with the message from stage. A message of love and acceptance. From the creative pen of Xander Steyn who has a list of productions that he has written, directed and choreographed – www.xanderartproductions.co.za – this is a production is a must see for every school and child in South Africa.

Nina has just woken from a bad dream. Or was it a dream? Either way, she can’t fall back asleep in case it comes back. But it’s bedtime now and the dark is making her feel strange, too… How is she going to navigate through this dark night and the nightmare stuck in her head?

Night Light uses live music, video projection, shadows, light-play and live performance to explore a night in the life of Nina, a young girl trying to deal with the thoughts and feelings which are haunting her as she lies in bed. The play evokes those moments when we feel alone: afraid of the dark, or going through life changes and unable to express ourselves. Aimed at 9-12 year olds who are at a delicate time, caught between the expectations of growing up and still haunted by childhood fears, this magical and mysterious piece encourages children to listen to their inner voice.

Mind Your Language is a children’s story that takes us through a short journey of the various languages and cultures South Africa has.  Three friends meet at pre-school and they all speak various South African languages. They get lost at a school field trip and in their journey of finding the rest of the class, they use the opportunity to introduce themselves and their culture by using songs and phrases from their indigenous languages. The friends soon learn how important it is to appreciate your mother language and how it is also important to learn other South African languages. The new friends then make a plea to each other that they are going to make sure they speak all the official languages before they get to “big” school.