My silence is talkative

Mphilo is a country teenage, who is born as a blessing in the eyes of the family because she has albinism. Her grandmother believes that she can cure the disease her older daughter has and that Mphilo’s body parts can make the family rich. Mpilo and her mother, Nozizwe, journey to confront the myths that allow young girls to be exploited, harassed and abused by authority figures in our communities. United they can reach beyond the wall of society’s myths. Nozizwe meets up with other women from different backgrounds and through Mphilo’s journey, they are able to better articulate their own struggles. Dlamini brings her strong directorial and aesthetic signature to the work, which does not employ the use of set, but rather uses the performers’ movement and bodies to give shape to the drama.

 

Emily Jade was no ordinary child…

She was shy and timid but adventurous and wild.

She was odd-looking, unpopular but also quite smart,

Despite failing Science, Geography, Maths, History & Art.

You see, Emily could not stay focused – a major flaw –

She never stopped daydreaming – not ever, at all.

Young Emily, who always ‘has her head in the clouds’, decides to take up the challenge of ending the drought once and for all. She invents a marvellous machine which she flies across the African continent in search of rain clouds.

Physical theatre (Avril Cummins) combines with ‘documentary-style’ video footage, a simple, creative set, and heaps of imagination. This educational and whimsical fantasy delivers a strong message of hope, resilience and empowerment.

“The Cloud Catcher” has been performed across South Africa, including at the Assitej World Conference (2017), entertaining and educating young audiences about the drought affecting much of the country.

Performed by Avril Cummins

A story of loss, love and hope. A young girl is missing. A distraught mother searches for her and the brother is locked in the house to keep him safe. The community rallies together and the hilarious neighbour joins the search.

This show is dedicated to all the missing children in our country.

Die towersleutel neem vir Kalla, Biebie, Vlooi en Flappie op ‘n avontuur na ‘n bos waar die singende, kokende Draak woon. Flappie beland in haar kloue, en amper in haar pot! Leerders sien bekende lees-woorde op die verhoog as deel van die rekwisiete, en word op ‘n interaktiewe manier bekendgestel aan basiese teater-terme.

The magic key sends Kalla on an adventure to the Litter Queen’s palace. He meets her two side-kicks, Rat and Poison, and experiences what it feels like when litter is not picked up, but thrown around. The audience helps the action along, by finding key words that are placed around the auditorium. A fun, literacy adventure!

‘Puppet Park’ is a newly written educational & musical production touching sensitive subjects regarding racism, homosexuality, family issues, abuse and bullying etc. Newly written songs will be added to assist with the message from stage. A message of love and acceptance. From the creative pen of Xander Steyn who has a list of productions that he has written, directed and choreographed – www.xanderartproductions.co.za – this is a production is a must see for every school and child in South Africa.

Nina has just woken from a bad dream. Or was it a dream? Either way, she can’t fall back asleep in case it comes back. But it’s bedtime now and the dark is making her feel strange, too… How is she going to navigate through this dark night and the nightmare stuck in her head?

Night Light uses live music, video projection, shadows, light-play and live performance to explore a night in the life of Nina, a young girl trying to deal with the thoughts and feelings which are haunting her as she lies in bed. The play evokes those moments when we feel alone: afraid of the dark, or going through life changes and unable to express ourselves. Aimed at 9-12 year olds who are at a delicate time, caught between the expectations of growing up and still haunted by childhood fears, this magical and mysterious piece encourages children to listen to their inner voice.

Mind Your Language is a children’s story that takes us through a short journey of the various languages and cultures South Africa has.  Three friends meet at pre-school and they all speak various South African languages. They get lost at a school field trip and in their journey of finding the rest of the class, they use the opportunity to introduce themselves and their culture by using songs and phrases from their indigenous languages. The friends soon learn how important it is to appreciate your mother language and how it is also important to learn other South African languages. The new friends then make a plea to each other that they are going to make sure they speak all the official languages before they get to “big” school.

Jade Bowers (2016 Standard Bank Young Artist, Naledi Theatre Awards Best Director for Scorched) and Ameera Patel (Naledi Theatre Awards Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Scorched) join forces to present ‘Black’. Based on CA Davids’ 2014 novel ‘The Blacks of Cape Town’, Gold Standard Bank Ovation Award-winning writer/director Penny Youngleson has written an adaptation for stage which intricately balances the poetry and pain of discovery, of unpacking history and the drama of family politics. Accomplished actress Patel tackles her first one-hander, under the directorial hand of Bowers, and with musical composition and accompaniment by Daniel Geddes.

While based abroad, historian Zara Black (Patel) learns via an officious but vague letter from the South African government, that documents once sealed and implicating her father in an act (which, while not clearly defined, was committed against the anti-apartheid movement decades earlier) will soon be released to the public. The resultant unearthing of her own past begins with Isaiah Black – the grandfather that ‘started it all’ when he stole a handful of diamonds from one of the world’s largest diamond mines in Kimberley. This act, however, is overshadowed by what the family considers his far greater crime – concealing his (mixed) race to escape the harsh realities of the mines before abandoning his mother and ultimately changing his name. His choice of surname is not without irony; because having been classified as mixed, he had passed as white, but had given rise to a line of coloured children and grandchildren. His granddaughter Zara finds herself alone and displaced in New Jersey, caught up in the excitement of an American election of a new and historic president, while trying to make sense of South Africa of the past and present: constructing a history for herself and her family from fragmented recollections and family lore.

WHAT THE WATER GAVE ME

By Rehane Abrahams

Directed by Jade Bowers

:: Cast ::

Cherae Halley

 

This powerful piece of authentically South African theatre is an elemental exploration, which digs up gestures and stories that have been buried in the darkness of Cape Town’s history. Flowing from lush stories of ancient majicks to gritty tales of urban terror, the play traces the stories of four characters, with a storyteller who weaves their worlds together. Through the resources of imagination, the characters are able to transfigure their existing realities. Awarded a SILVER Standard Bank OVATION at the National Arts Festival 2014 this production has been called “as beautiful as it is compelling” and “a performance worth seeing.”

 

 

:: JADE BOWERS is a theatre director, production, set, sound and lighting designer, and also Theatrical Rights Administrator for DALRO. Named one of AfriPOP’s Top Five Female Theatre Makers in South Africa, last year she was also nominated for a Naledi Theatre Award. For more info find Jade Bowers Design and Management on Facebook and follow @jadeherself.

 

:: CHERAE HALLEY

Cheraé Halley was born in the Eastern Cape, East London and moved to Johannesburg where she completed both honours and masters in Dramatic Arts at the University of the Witwatersrand.  She completed three years of South African Sign Language studies as an extra course. Having studied Applied Theatre and Performance Studies, Cheraé has a burning desire to create theatre with both Deaf and hearing people with particular interest in HIV/AIDS and using drama as process to educate and dialogue on the matter.  In 2010 Cheraé was awarded the Drama For Life scholarship through which she completed her award winning, practice lead research MA research.

In 2012, having a passion for the stage, Cheraé performed in the recently published controversial play The Merry Wives of Zuma written and directed by Pieter-Dirk Uys.Cheraé is a member of the DFL Playback Theatre company in South Africa, and has completed both core training and advanced training courses in Playback Theatre.

Cheraé currently is the project officer for the HIV/AIDS Deaf awareness project at GALAGALA (Gay and Lesbian memory in Action) which travels across Deaf schools in Johannesburg using educational theatre in addressing HIV/AIDS.  She facilitates Applied Theatre workshops for the University of Johannesburg Art Centre and since 2013,Cheraé has been coordinating and lecturing the Applied Theatre Studies IIIA course, (now including IIIB) at Wits University under the Division of Drama For Life.

Theatre 4 Youth